5 more books sold!!!

Thank you – whomever you are – for purchasing and reading my book.  If you have had a difficult life, were married, divorced, remarried, if you have now have grandkids, and you are still laughing  – you will relate to the story of my life!  18 % of sales goes to Memorial Sloan Kettering for keeping me alive!

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TOO GOOD TO EAT…

Kudos to NYC for really teaching.  My grandson just “graduated” from kindergarten.  This is a ceramic piece he made after learning about Wayne Thiebaud, his favorite artist.  Of course that was a month ago.  Now his favorite artist is Jim Dine.  I can talk to him about Picasso and Leger and O’Keefe and the list goes on.

For graduation, he told me, his class was going to sing “It’s a Wonderful World,” by Louis Armstrong.  Yes, he knew who wrote the song and he knew some history about Armstrong.

His music teacher encouraged him to learn piano and so he is.  And he practices 10 minutes everyday.

THANK YOU NYC for doing your job in educating my grandson.  THERE ARE NO TEACHERS LIKE NYC PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS once the city makes up its mind to do the job!

From one teacher to all of you, THANK YOU!!!!!

Four more just sold…

This book is an easy read but makes you think.  Please take it with you to the beach or pool or consider giving as a gift.  My book goes great with summer.

I talked stocks to my 6 year old grandson!

I watch Jim Cramer whenever I can and I listen to him.  I do not buy stocks based on his recommendations BUT I listen to his advice.  I am a teacher, like him.  He tells us to get kids interested in stocks at an early age.  And the way to do it is by asking them what products they know and like.  Well,  after a sloppy explanation of what a stock is, and even I cannot wrap my head around what a stock actually is, I asked my grandson if he would be interested in the Walt Disney Company.  He said he did not like Frozen, so he would pass on that hypothetical stock.  But then he said he would like Netflix.  Now why didn’t I ask him 2 years ago, when Netflix was still affordable?  Then he thought:  What about a company that makes…you guessed it:  CHOCOLATE?

THE BLANKET

My dollhouse was holy.  No one was allowed to touch it.  I would know in a heartbeat if something was out of place.  I made a braided carpet for the living room.  I had a table and chairs for the kitchen.  But I never acquired kitchen appliances.  And I do not recall having a dollhouse bathroom.  I drew pictures and hung them on the walls.  I cut out a watch out from a magazine and hung it on the back of the bookcase and it served as a clock.  There were no stairs.  It didn’t look that much different from our apartment.  But no one yelled in my dollhouse.  In fact, no one spoke.  It was quiet.  It was perfect.  

I was six years old before I met her.  She finally came from Israel to meet her grandchildren.  My bubbie came on a Sunday, her head covered.  But when she was getting ready for bed, she took her kerchief off and I saw her brush her hair.  She did not have one gray strand.

Monday morning came and I had to leave for school.  I was reluctant.  No one had showered me with love before.  No one blew kisses at me and smiled warmly.  This grandma, however, was not shy and she squinted her eyes, kissed my forehead, and said:

“Ai, geshmackta!” 

I thought that geshmackta was the name for the type of kiss she gave me, her lips closing in with a smack and warmth that started at the site of the kiss and penetrated my soul.  It was only a little while ago that I came to understand that: “Ai, geshmackta” means “Oh, delicious!” inYiddish and that this grandma, who did not know me, was calling me “Delicious!”

When I came home that Monday late afternoon, my bubbie was gone.  She went on to visit her other grandchildren.  But when I went to my dollhouse, there was a bright pink and cornflower blue blanket on the big bed.  Evidently my grandmother had asked my mother for scrap yarn and she took the time to crochet that blanket for me.  I learned another important lesson about love that day.  I realized that even though my grandmother could not communicate with me in words, she “got” me.  She recognized how important that dollhouse was for me.  She chose to make me something to show me that she understood me.  And I learned what loved felt like.

Maybe that is why I learned how to knit and instead of making sweaters I focused my efforts on making afghans  and throws for all the people who I love.  When my daughter went off to college, she went armed with a beautiful wool blanket so she would be warm even if the dorm was drafty.  When my daughter got engaged, I asked her to pick a pattern and colors and I made her an afghan as part of her engagement gift.  When my grandson was born, I made him a cotton baby blanket and a wool blanket for the carriage.  Then I made him a throw when he moved into a real bed.  I just finished a blanket for my granddaughter.  It is a dusty teal, the perfect color to offset her light complexion, burnt sienna eyes, and strawberry blond curls.  

My granddaughter aptly calls blankets “cozies.”  So, I am giving her the teal blanket for her third birthday.  And I have a date with my granddaughter.  On her seventh birthday, I will take her to the knitting store and teach her beginning knitting.  On her tenth birthday, I will help her make her first afghan.  

OFFSHOOTS FROM WRITING

I got to sit in Johanna Hurwitz’s study and chat with her for almost two hours.  Johanna Hurwitz, author of CLASS CLOWN, ALI BABA BERNSTEIN, ALDO APPLESAUCE AND MORE THAN 70 OTHER BOOKS, is my hero.  This invite came via mutual friends who read my book.  I had taken a workshop with Johanna years ago.

Anyway, my daughter sent the principal of my grandson’s school Johanna’s proposal.  I am praying that Johanna Hurwitz, who is one of my daughter’s beloved authors, and is now my grandson’s and granddaughter’s beloved author, will be a guest speaker at my my grandson’s school.  I will post when this will actually happen.

IF YOU HAVE GRANDKIDS, GO TO AMAZON.COM AND PURCHASE HER BOOKS AS GIFTS. YOUR OWN KIDS WILL THANK YOU FOR REMINDING THEM OF SOME OF THEIR CHILDHOOD FAVORITES.

GIVE ME BACK MY FACE!

GIVE ME BACK MY FACE
Jacqueline Becker

I have come to the conclusion that there is a narcissist inside each and every one of us. My granddaughter— well, she looks like me. Even though she has her dad’s nose and his mother’s round face, she looks like me. Even though she is built a little chunky and she has sturdy legs and feet, and I have thin legs and high arches, she looks like me. She does not have my blue eyes. But she has my hair. Her hair is curly and wavy. It has a wildness to it. It needs work. But after a bit of detangler and after someone runs a comb through it, and after someone twists a little piece and puts a ribbon in, she is striking.
She has my look, my expressions, my feistiness. She is charming and likes to laugh. She likes to make others laugh. She is engaging and she can hold a conversation.
I had plucked a wild chin hair and it left a mark. June noticed it when I was changing her diaper.
“What’s that boo-boo?” she asked with sweet compassion. She reached up and gently pulled my face down and said:
“I want to kiss that boo-boo.” And she did.
Then she squirmed off the bed with an intent look on her face. She has something to do and somewhere she has to be. She is two and a half.
Dare to cross her, and she will give you a piece of her mind. On occasion, she is known to scream:
“Get out of here! I didn’t ask for YOU!”
I cannot help it.
“Give me back my face,” I say mildly amused. She laughs and pretends to rip her face off and put it on my head.
“Give me back my hair,” I continue in awe that my looks and possibly my personality skipped a generation. She is undeniably a part of me. She pretends to pull her hair out and puts it on me. But in a split second she takes back both her face and her hair.
I look at her and I see a little me. And I can’t help but be a little narcissistic and ever so proud!

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