I WILL HAVE A BOOK IN MY HANDS NEXT WEEK!!!

63560842_Kindle Ready Front Cover JPEG_7094703 2.jpgTHIS BOOK WILL BE SHIPPED TO ME NEXT WEEK.  THEN I WILL GET A DATE WHEN IT WILL BE OFFICIALLY AVAILABLE TO PURCHASE ON AMAZON AND / OR KINDLE.

PLEASE CELEBRATE WITH ME.  I AM A STORY TELLER, AND WHILE I AM TELLING THE STORY OF MY LIFE, I RELIED ON SOME OF THE STORIES YOU SHARED WITH ME.   I COULD NOT HAVE WRITTEN THIS BOOK WITHOUT ALL OF YOU AND SOME OF YOU I ONLY MET ON FACEBOOK.

 

 

TO DECLUTTER OR NOT TO DECLUTTER? That is the question!

Now, I will not lie.  I am vain. But surely, you have figured that out, because it takes a certain amount of vanity to blog. 

I used to imagine that what we had tried but had not accomplished in our life, would get accomplished in our death.  I imagined our children – my one and my husband’s three – would come back to our house after “the funerals” and would stay and go through our stuff and talk and connect and find out who we really were by going through our stuff.  I imagined “the girls” fingering my jewelry and dividing it up.  I imagined them choosing which paintings and photographs they would take back with them and keep.  I imagined “the boys” going through my husband’s sports collectibles and equipment and dividing them up.  I imagined them sharing the photographs and swapping stories.

We are Jewish and we sit shiva for seven days.  Surely that would allow enough time for all this bonding that never took place during our living years, to take place. 

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Then I remembered that my step children are not Jewish.  They live far away.  They have their own children and their own lives and they work. 

So the question is:  Do we do the children a favor and start getting rid of the excesses and NOT replace the stuff that we sell or give away or throw away?  Or do we burden them by making them go through decades of our lives? 

What to do with all this stuff?

My mother gave her “good” jewelry away after she got her cancer in her mid sixties.  She went onto live another thirty years and went to many more bar-mitzvahs, weddings, and baby showers. And she replaced her “good” jewelry with marcasite pins, necklaces, earrings, bracelets because, yes, she still needed to accessorize!

I would love to give some of my “good jewelry” away but my daughter does not have a home.  She is in an apartment and will move any day now.  I would love to give some of my paintings away.  But my daughter is cramped for space.  My stepchildren cannot take any of my paintings because their mother has created a rivalry and they cannot display my art.  I might start selling them on www.etsy.com or www.ebay.com.  So, please start bidding!!!!

Oh. I forgot.  You are also in your sixties and the last thing you want, is MORE STUFF!!!!!

ALL THIS STUFF!!!!!!

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I have my old stamp collection from when I was seven.  My husband has common baseball cards from the 50s.

We have scrapbooks and CDs.  Who really uses CDs anymore?

We have seashells that I collected from every beach vacation that we took.

We have seven years of tax returns.

We have gardening tools that may be considered antique by now.

I have afghans and shawls that I had knitted.  I have all the circular and straight knitting needles I thought I would use forever.

We have balls – baseballs, tennis balls, basketballs, bowling balls, beach balls, soccer balls, golf balls.

I have throw pillows from every decorating and redecorating phase.

I have carpets from every decorating and redecorating phase.

We have playbills from all the Broadway and off Broadway shows we have ever seen.  They don’t take up much space and they tell a story of fun.

We have lived in this beach cottage of 984 sq. ft. for decades!!!!  So how much stuff could we really accumulate in such a small space?

And yet there is still all this stuff!!!!!!!

TOO MUCH STUFF!!!! PART 1

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So tell the truth… How many of you have looked around your house or apartment and asked yourself how much stuff do you really need? 

I know that I have accumulated stuff and have gotten rid of stuff only to accumulate again and again and again.

I bought books and sold books.  I bought more books.

I bought clothes and I sold and/or donated clothes. I bought more clothes.

We have had garage sales.  We have sold stuff on ebay.  We have packed up stuff and are storing it in the attic, the basement, and the backyard sheds.  But we still have stuff.

My walls are full of paintings.  Maybe yours are full of photographs.

My shelves hold things I “need.”  But I collect vintage tablecloths and I do not know why.

I have lots of handmade necklaces with so called semi precious stones from my working days when I had discretionary income.  I have Vera Bradley bags when everyone thought they would be the next collectible.  I have a few depression and carnival glassware pieces that I inherited from my dearest aunt.

I have all sorts of vases. 

I have a wooden sign that sits atop my shelves in my office that says:  ACHIEVE.  For the love of God, achieve what?

to be continued

After retirement

We walk to the bus stop. 

I don’t tell my husband that seniors can ride for half price.  I don’t want to call attention to myself.  We came to the city to escape the obvious and my husband does not want me to remind him that we are aging.  “Does it make you feel better?” he asks every time I try to bring up the topic.  “Work will help us stay young,” is his mantra.  Only I don’t want to work so hard anymore.  The problem is that all my husband has is work and I, myself, cannot find a real substitute for the work I have retired from.

Have any of you readers had an issue retiring?

It is not so easy as the commercials make it seem.  You never feel how you have aged.  And my husband is right, work will keep you young but you also have to have time for all the things you need to do before it is too late.  Has anyone gotten the balance right?